History of Colchester

Colchester © Copyright The Francis Frith Collection 2005. http://www.francisfrith.com
Roman Walls, Colchester, 1892
Reproduced courtesy of The Francis Frith Collection.

History of Colchester >> Education in Colchester

Education in Colchester

Reports and returns on schools and education in Colchester. These allow a glimpse into the education your ancestors may have received if they were from this parish.

1818

"St Nicholas Parish. Population 915. A national school, supported in part by voluntary subscription, and partly by rent of houses, and interest of money transferred by the trustees of the Blue coat charity school, which was discontinued on establishing the national school; which transfer was made in consideration of all the children of the old establishment being educated by the master of the new institution. About 184 boys and 193 girls are instructed, 65 of the former, and 41 of the latter, are clothed by the trustees of the Blue coat school, and 30 of each sex by the committee of the national school, and whenever the subscriptions admit of it, as many more. The master has a salary of £80 per annum, the mistress £40 besides a house and coals. The funds for the support of the school are voluntary subscriptions, amounting last year to £91 7s. and £111 2s. 3d. collected at an anniversary meeting; and the trustees of the previously existing school, transferred last year £120 arising in part from the subscription, and from the rent of houses and interest of money. A small legacy of about £15 per annum was left in 1800, for the support of the then existing Sunday schools, with a proviso that should those schools be discontinued, the trustees named under the will should apply the legacy to any other charitable purpose, according to their discretion, and the trustees apply the legacy conformably to the direction of the donor, in support of the national school, the Sunday schools having been given up. The poor have sufficient means of education, and no children are refused admittance to the national schools in the town, who will conform to the existing regulations.

Saint Botolph Parish. Population 1,982. A Lancasterian school, supported by voluntary contribution, in which fron 210 to 230 children are taught, including those taught on Sunday, limited number of which used to be clothed; but it is intended by the subscribers to clothe the whole this year. The salaries of the master and mistress amount to £100 per annum. Also four or Ůve day and night schools. The poor have ample means afforded them of educating their children.

Saint Giles Parish. Population 1,202. The poor attend at the national schools in the town of Colchester, but there are not sufficient means of instruction, although they are very desirous of possessing them.

Saint James Parish. Population 1,113. The Colchester national schools receive the children of all who are desirous of being educated.

Saint Leonard Parish. Population 830. A day school, containing 30 children, and seven schools kept by women, in which 107 children are instructed. The poor have ample means of education in the national schools of the town, of which they avail themselves.

St Martin Parish. Population 722. The poor have the means of education at the national schools in Colchester.

St Mary at the Walls Parish. Population 992. The poor have the means of education at the national schools in Colchester.

St Mary Magdalen Parish. Population 474. The poor avail themselves of the large schools in the town of Colchester.

St Peter Parish. Population 1,441. Two girls schools, supported by voluntary contributions, and about four day schools, aat which the poor pay for their children's instruction. The poor are now without the means of education."

Source: Digest of Parochial Returns. Select Committee on Education of the Poor, 1818

1833

"COLCHESTER BOROUGH AND LIBERTIES
All Saints Parish. Population 438. Three Daily Schools: one of which is a classical School, endowed by Queen Elizabeth for the instruction of 16 children, the sons of burgesses born in the town; the master must be a graduate, master of arts of one of the Universities, and licensed by the Bishop of London; who is the visitor; another School (commenced 1830) containing 9 of both sexes; the other (commenced 1833) 11 males; in the two last Schools the children are instructed at the expense of their parents.

St Botolph Parish. Population 2,560. Two Daily Schools: whereof one a British School contains 183 males and 117 females, and is partly supported by subscription and partly by small weekly payments from the children; in the other (commenced 1825) are 50 males, who receive instruction at the expense of their parents. Two Sunday Schools: whereof one is connected with Independents and consists of 120 males and 112 females; the other with Baptists, of 47 males and 73 females; these Schools are supported by voluntary contributions and have lending Libraries attached.

St Giles Parish. Population 1,606. Two Infant Schools: whereof one (commenced 1832) contains 63 males and 88 females, and is partly supported by subscription, and partly by penny payments from the children; in the other (commenced 1833) are 5 ot each sex, who are paid for by their parents. Four Daily Schools: two of which contain 18 males and 17 females; another (commenced 1820) 6 males and 14 females; the other (commenced 1833) 10 females; the children in these Schools receive instruction at the expense of their parents.

St James Parish. Population 1,439. Two Infant Schools: whereof one (commenced 1830) contains about 8 children of each sex; the other (commenced 1833) 2 males and 3 females. Six Daily Schools: three of which contain as follows: 12 males; 2 males and 12 females (commenced 1825); 10 males and 8 females (commenced 1830); two others (commenced 1831) about 18 males and 31 females; the other (commenced 1833) 1 male and 3 females. One Boarding School (commenced 1829) in which 26 females are receiving education. In all the above Schools the children are paid for by their parents. One Sunday School (commenced 1830) wherein 7 females are instructed gratuitously.

St Leonard Parish. Population 983. Four Daily Schools, in which 41 males and 55 females receive instruction at the expense of their parents. Two Sunday Schools, wherein 40 males and 70 females are receiving gratuitous instruction.

St Martin Parish. Population 1,035. One Daily School, containing 8 males and 7 females. One Boarding School, 15 females, in both of which the instruction is at the expense of their parents. One Sunday School, attended by 40 males and 60 females, is supported by annual collections.

St Mary at the Walls Parish. Population 1,314. Three Infant Schools (one of which commenced in 1833) collectively containing about 14 males and 10 females. Four Daily Schools, 15 males and 45 females. The children in all the above Schools receive instruction at the expense of their parents. Three Day and Boarding Schools: in one of which are 47 males, 6 of whom are educated from the proceeds of an endowment, and the remainder are paid for by their parents; this School is nominally confined to the Society of Friends, and has a lending Library attached; the other two contain 33 males and 28 females, who are educated at the expense of their parents.

St Mary Magdalen Parish. Population 449. Three Daily Schools, containing 79 males and 103 females, are supported by subscription. One Sunday School, attended by 14 males and 26 females; is partly supported by subscription, and partly by penny payments from the children

St Nicholas Parish. Population 1,035. Four Daily Schools: one whereof is a National School, with which is incorporated a Charity School: the former contains 322 males and 95 females, and the latter 60 males and 42 females. The National School is supported by annual subscription and penny payments from the children, and the Charity School, by endowment and annual subscription. The children are taught by the same master and mistressm the funds only being kept separate, The children in the old Charity School are clothedmm but only a certain number in the National School, according to merit, clothing being given as a reward for good conduct. The children assemble in the school room on the Sunday, and proceed from thence to Church; in the other, three Schools (commenced since 1818) 14 males and 50 females are instructed at the expense of their parents.

St Peter Parish. Population 1,834. Three Infant Schools: one whereof (commenced 1826) containing 103 males and 89 females is partly supported by subscription, and partly by penny payments from the children; in the other two (one of which commenced in 1830) about 14 males and 20 females are receiving instruction at the expense of their parents. Three Daily Schools: in two whereof are 47 males and 27 females; and in the other (commenced 1823) are 30 females; in these Schools the children are paid for by their parents. Three Boarding Schools: two containing 23 females, and the other (commenced 1826) 24 males; in these Schools the education is at the expense of their parents. One Sunday School, wherein are 145 males and 195 females; it is supported by voluntary contributions and has a lending Library attached.

St Runwald Parish. Population 461. Two Daily Schools (commenced about 1826) in which 27 children of both sexes receive instruction at the expense of their parents.

Trinity Holy Parish. Population 612. Four Daily Schools: in two of which are 38; in another(commenced 1831) 10; and in the other (commenced 1833) 14 children of both sexes; in all these Schools the instruction is at the expense of the parents."

Source: House of Commons papers, Volume 41. Abstract of Education Returns 1833

1846

Girls 73; infants 120; attached to St Peter's church. Same teachers as last year. The mistress has taken pains and somewhat improved the girls' school. The infant school is well conducted by master and young woman. Good simultaneous teaching."

Source: Minutes of the Committee of Council on Education by Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools, Volume 1, 1846

1869

Detailed report on Colchester Grammar School in the House of Commons paper Volume 28, Part 11, on Endowed Grammar Schools.

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